Is it OK to Spy On Your Employees?

Ah, the digital age. So much progress. So much productivity. So many more ways for your employees to avoid doing their jobs while they’re on the clock. And that’s where employee-tracking software comes in. For those who don’t know, this is perfectly legal software you install on your office’s computers to track what your employees are doing on the computer throughout the day. But as a manager, officer, director, or whatever position of power you hold in your company, you need to make sure you are implementing your employee-monitoring policies in a proper way. And here are three key points to keep in mind that can go a long way to properly implementing your policies.

Anonymity

While you may think the best policy is to hunt down those time-wasters so you can single them out for termination, a much better policy is to analyze the employee-tracking readouts in bulk to get a better feel for what your employees are doing on the whole—not necessarily individually. This way you can keep morale high since you’re not on a warpath to eliminate jobs, and you can avoid all kinds of wrongful termination suits that may spring up from disgruntled employees where terminated after you were spying on them.

Transparency

As with any company-wide policies—and especially ones with such negative connotations as employee-tracking—you need to be as transparent as possible when it comes to monitoring your employees. The more they know, the more at ease they will feel about the whole process. And the more at ease they feel, the more accurate the data you’ll be able to collect and analyze. And again, be clear with your employees you’re using that tracking information as a learning tool instead of a tool used to eliminate your staff based on their on the job browsing habits.

Good Judgment

Finally, the best way to properly institute an employee-tracking program is to make sure you use your best judgment. If something seems wrong, it probably is and you should not do it. Keep in mind whether you would like to be in the employee’s position and whether if you, in that position, would feel like your privacy was being completely violated by your employer’s actions. As long as you use your best judgment in implementing employee tracking, you’re already on the right track to staying out of trouble.

Image Courtesy: kevin dooley

Eric Norton

Eric Norton

Business & Trademark Attorney at Norton Law Corporation
Eric Norton is a business and trademark attorney, and the founder of Norton Law Corporation, a modern law firm designed to help entrepreneurs with their legal needs. Eric also enjoys photography, gaming (tabletop and video), watches, and good design.
Eric Norton

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